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As top executives, it seems everyone comes to you for the answers to their questions. What about your inquiries? CFO’s face a challenge of not having anyone to lean on when they come across an issue or problem. Since you are the CFO, you may not be as comfortable to run to your boss or a fellow chief officer to seek help. image[7]

Mentors are great partners to have even if you hold a top executive position. Not only can they talk you through a situation, but they can also be great motivational partners. These people could have been CFOs or simply know the ins and outs of being a chief executive. Board members may not always be available and could have advice that would only benefit them.

Finding a mentor can also be a challenge if you do not have someone close to fit that role. Contacting a person that you are not close with may not be in your best interest. It is also a good idea to meet with a potential mentor in person to have a discussion about partnering together. Discuss what you need help with, what your strengths and weaknesses are and what you are looking for in a mentor.

You have to be ready to want a mentor. Since your goal may be getting advice you have to be willing to take advice. Some may have an issue receiving advice because it may not be what you are expecting to hear. Be open to opinions and think about what is being said before you shut it off completely. If there is a disagreement, talk through it and let your mentor know exactly what is going through your head.

Baker Creative Relativity blog is a great resource from management challenges to personal growth. Baker Creative has management services such as strategic planning; execution and improved communications tailor fit to meet your needs.

As top executives, it seems everyone comes to you for the answers to their questions. What about your inquiries? CFO’s face a challenge of not having anyone to lean on when they come across an issue or problem. Since you are the CFO, you may not be as comfortable to run to your boss or a fellow chief officer to seek help.

Mentors are great partners to have even if you hold a top executive position. Not only can they talk you through a situation, but they can also be great motivational partners. These people could have been CFOs or simply know the ins and outs of being a chief executive. Board members may not always be available and could have advice that would only benefit them.

Finding a mentor can also be a challenge if you do not have someone close to fit that role. Contacting a person that you are not close with may not be in your best interest. It is also a good idea to meet with a potential mentor in person to have a discussion about partnering together. Discuss what you need help with, what your strengths and weaknesses are and what you are looking for in a mentor.

You have to be ready to want a mentor. Since your goal may be getting advice you have to be willing to take advice. Some may have an issue receiving advice because it may not be what you are expecting to hear. Be open to opinions and think about what is being said before you shut it off completely. If there is a disagreement, talk through it and let your mentor know exactly what is going through your head.

Baker Creative Relativity blog is a great resource from management challenges to personal growth. Baker Creative has management services such as strategic planning; strategic execution and improved communications tailor fit to meet your needs.